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Bonsai & trees

BONSAI CARE GUIDE

Ginseng Ficus

The ginseng ficus is one of the easiest bonsai you can grow, because it is really hard to kill! It is a great bonsai for beginners because they can tolerate a lot of punishment. With its thick trunk and bushy leaves, the ginseng bonsai is perfect for someone who wants to learn how to bonsai trees indoors!

  • Being a tropical plant, the warmth of the indoors provides a great starting point for the ginseng bonsai. Avoid really cold conditions. Think Southeast Asia.
  • Ginseng bonsai will thrive in humid conditions. Placing them near other plants, or sitting them on a tray filled with pebbles and water will help increase humidity. Spraying leaves with a mister often will also increase humidity. Humidifiers will also help mimic the ‘jungle conditions’ that the ginseng ficus love.
  • Water about 1-2 times per week. Water when the top of the soil dries out. Never let dry out completely.
  • For optimum care, fertilize with plant food once every 2-3 weeks from spring through summer. During fall and winter time fertilize once every 2-3 months.
  • Watch the tips of the leaves for signs of drying, or nutritional needs. A lush green is the ideal colour, yellowing is a sign of nutritional deficiency, while browning is a sign of over watering or over fertilizing.
  • It is normal for leaves to fall off here and there, but if your ginseng’s leaves are dropping at an alarming rate (more than 2-3 per day), it is trying to tell you something. Usually this will happen because of lack of light, fertilizer, or watering.
  • Do not place near heater, or in a room with a fireplace, the leaves will shed quickly. This is not because it is too hot, but because the dry air. Ginseng bonsai prefer humid environments, so be sure they are not sitting in a dry, stale environment.

Can be placed outside (in shade) during warmer months. Bring inside during fall and winter

Juniper Bonsai 

When you think of bonsai, you’re probably thinking of the juniper bonsai. Classic and timeless, the juniper is a very popular bonsai with both beginners and experts. Although a juniper bonsai would be classified as a ‘beginner bonsai’, they do require some specific care, especially if you are growing it indoors.

  • Junipers generally grow in colder areas of the world so they require a ‘dormant’ period during the winter where they pretty much hibernate and don’t grow much. In Vancouver, Canada where we’re from, placing your juniper outside during winter is highly recommended.
  • If you insist on keeping them indoors during winter, you should place it in the garage, or a drafty unoccupied room, where the temperature will be low (below 15 degrees Celsius). For condo or apartment dwellers, the patio is a good place to put your juniper during winter.
  • Junipers can be left outdoors all year round here in Vancouver. Try to protect the roots from freezing, and the rain from soaking your pots all the time, so we recommend placing them underneath a protective cover to shield them from any extremities that might occur during the seasons
  • If you want to grow your juniper indoors (it can be done), you need to make sure it gets a lot of light. Underneath a sky light or near the window are ideal. Additionally, you should probably get some artificial lighting, such as a fluorescent or LED growing light to mimic the bright days of spring and summer.
  • Water about 1-2 times per week. Water when the top of the soil dries out, never let dry out completely.
  • For optimum care, fertilize with plant food once every 2-3 weeks from spring through summer.
  • During fall and winter time fertilize once every 2-3 months

If your juniper becomes dry or the needles go brown, it probably needs more water, or light.

Money Tree Care Guide

The pachira or ‘money tree’, as it is commonly known, is great gift for a home or a business. They represent luck and good fortune and are not hard to care for. They can grow up to 8 feet high, and are always shooting out new leaves.

  • Being a tropical plant, the warmth of the indoors provides a great starting point for the Money Tree. Avoid really cold conditions. Think Amazon rainforest, or Southeast Asia.
  • Money Trees will thrive in humid conditions. Placing them near other plants, or sitting them on a tray filled with pebbles and water will help increase humidity. Spraying leaves with a mister often will also help increase humidity. Humidifiers will also help mimic the ‘jungle conditions’ that the money tree will thrive in.
  • Water about 1-2 times per week. Water when the top of the soil dries out. Never let dry out completely.
  • For optimum care, fertilize with plant food once every 2-3 weeks from spring through summer. During fall and winter fertilize once every 2-3 months.
  • If leaves are yellowing, it might need some fertilizer, or more filtered light. Do not put outside. Clip off any dead/dying leaves and wait for new growth (They can grow super fast!)
  • Watch the tips of the leaves for signs of drying, or nutritional needs. A lush green is the ideal colour, yellowing is a sign of nutritional or lighting deficiency, while browning is a sign of over watering or over fertilizing.

Myrtle Care Guide

Myrtles are the cutest plants, especially the small desktop myrtles! These plants have a minty smell and the leaves can actually be used to cook! According to Greek Mythology, the myrtle was a sacred plant to the goddess Aphrodite. These plants are not hard to care for, but require much maintenance as they are not hardy at all.

  • Water. Water. Water. Never let your myrtle dry out completely, it will die. Once the top of the soil starts to dry you need to water your myrtle. About 1-2 times per week is optimal, or a little bit everyday if you have the time. Be careful not to over water either though!
  • Place near a window for optimum lighting, but they can tolerate low levels of light as well.
  • During summer, they will dry out faster and will need to be watered more often.
  • Use a humidifier or spray the leaves with a mister often, as they enjoy the extra humidity.
  • To grow the myrtle ‘ball’ evenly, rotate ¼ turn every week, then after 4 weeks, trim to maintain shape.
  • Do not place near heater or air conditioner. It does not like extreme heat or cold.
  • For optimum care, fertilize with plant food once every 2-3 weeks from spring through summer.
  • During fall and winter time fertilize once every 2-3 months.
  • If the plant starts to dry out from one side, slowly, it is probably being over watered. Remember, do not water until the top starts to dry out.
  • If the plant dries out evenly from all sides, it is probably being under watered. Remember, to never let them dry out completely.
  • Wilting or curling leaves at the tips is one of the first (and last) signs that your myrtle is being under watered. Act fast!

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